Toronto

Shannon Bool, Oued Ouchaia, 2018, jacquard tapestry, embroidery, 6' 10“ × 10' 8”.

Shannon Bool

Daniel Faria Gallery

While Shannon Bool’s show “Bomb. Shell.” featured many provocatively posed women, the images hardly qualified as pinups. Rather, they reflected Bool’s long-standing interest in combining the tactics of the historical avant-gardes (photomontage and Cubist collage) with unconventional materials and methods (wool and sewing) to slyly short-circuit (rather than explode, as the show’s title implied) masculinist mythologies of modernism. Bool’s subversions are playful yet satirical, and critical in ways that run deep, partially because of their compositional complexity. 

Take the pair of striking jacquard tapestries on view here: Both included two female figures derived from erotic, exoticizing drawings made by Le Corbusier in Algiers while he was developing his absurdly ambitious (and never realized) Plan Obus, 1932–42. In Bool’s hands, the bodies interact with the floor plans and elevation

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