New York

Martha Rosler, Semiotics of the Kitchen, 1975, video, black-and-white, sound, 6 minutes 13 seconds.

Martha Rosler, Semiotics of the Kitchen, 1975, video, black-and-white, sound, 6 minutes 13 seconds.

Martha Rosler

The Jewish Museum

Martha Rosler doesn’t suffer fools. Pointedly and with blunt humor, the artist has delivered biting critiques of the misogyny, racism, and exploitative economics that characterize American capitalism and its hypocrisies. Yet the sheer volume of works in “Irrespective,” the Jewish Museum’s potent survey covering roughly fifty years of Rosler’s artmaking, resists any attempt to pigeonhole her art as purely “about” feminism or gentrification. The museum’s cramped first-floor galleries—in which photographs, videos, installations, and sculptures had been wrangled into unruly sections—work to reinforce the sense that the profusion of her production underscores her intersectional approach, in both form and content.

“Irrespective” makes clear that video remains Rosler’s most powerful medium. Semiotics of the Kitchen, 1975, the artist’s aggressive demonstration of a domestic alphabet (from A as in

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