Bogotá

Oscar Murillo, Catalyst, 2015, clay, C-print, wood, 31 1⁄2 × 12 5⁄8 × 5 1⁄2".

Wilson Díaz and Oscar Murillo

Instituto de visión

The book Parque Industrial (Industrial Park, 1933) by Brazilian writer Patrícia Galvão—better known as Pagu (1910–1962)—is considered the first “proletarian novel” in Latin American literature. It confronts uncomfortable subjects tied to the oppression and exploitation of the working class, especially women, and provided the evocative trail—or, better, the metatext—for Wilson Díaz and Oscar Murillo’s intriguing exhibition, “Paradoxon Spirituale” (Spiritual Paradox). While they have different sensibilities and poetics, and are from different generations—Díaz was born in 1963, Murillo twenty-three years later—the two Colombian artists have a similar approach, based on an open-minded stylistic eclecticism and the use of multiple media as well as a marked interest in social issues. Díaz, who grew up during the most violent years of Colombia’s armed conflict, evokes the past to investigate the

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