London

Beatrice Gibson,  I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead, 2018, 16 mm, color, sound, 20 minutes 47 seconds.

Beatrice Gibson, I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead, 2018, 16 mm, color, sound, 20 minutes 47 seconds.

Beatrice Gibson

Camden Arts Centre

If I had to select a favorite scene from the two unforgettable films in Beatrice Gibson’s exhibition “Crone Music,” I’d choose the closing sequence of I Hope I’m Loud When I’m Dead (all works 2018), which shows the artist and her five-year-old son, Obie, dancing wildly to Corona’s 1993 disco anthem “The Rhythm of the Night.” The film takes its title from a poem by CAConrad, who appears in it alongside Eileen Myles. Inspired by the final scene of Claire Denis’s 1999 film Beau Travail, which saw actor Denis Lavant breaking into a frenetic solitary dance to the same song before the mirrored walls of a nightclub, Gibson’s mother-and-son remake is an exuberant performance. The pair are not so much engaged in a raucous pas de deux as they are moving to their own beat, to their own inner music. They are happily alone, together.

Another especially gripping scene occurs in Gibson’s companion film,

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