Vilnius

 Julijonas Urbonas, A Planet of People (detail), 2018, 3-D human scanner, custom electronics  and software, astrophysics simulation, PVC curtain, sandblasted stainless steel. Installation view. Photo: Aistė Valiūtė

Julijonas Urbonas, A Planet of People (detail), 2018, 3-D human scanner, custom electronics and software, astrophysics simulation, PVC curtain, sandblasted stainless steel. Installation view. Photo: Aistė Valiūtė

Julijonas Urbonas

Galerija Vartai

If you were lucky, you might have been greeted by the dense sounds of a grand piano at the start of your visit to “A Planet of People,” a recent solo show by the Lithuanian artist, designer, and engineer Julijonas Urbonas. In these concerts, which took place periodically during the course of the exhibition, the composer, sound artist, and improviser Gaile˙ Griciu¯te˙ periodically played excerpts from the opera-cum-art installation Honey, Moon!—conceived and directed by Urbonas in 2018—on a piano inside a shiny, wavy circular structure that rotated in the room like an elegant spaceship.

Evolving from the artist’s longtime interest in what he calls “gravitational aesthetics,” the exhibition presented a scientifically grounded but artistically interpreted proposal to create a new celestial object by catapulting human bodies into space in such a way that they would arrive at a Lagrangian

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