Frankfurt

View of “Cady Noland,” 2018–19. Foreground: Cady Noland, Dead Space, 1989. Background, from left: Kenneth C. Noland, Touch, 1963; Steven Parrino, Bent Painting, 1991. Photo: Axel Schneider.

Cady Noland

MUSEUMᴹᴹᴷ FÜR MODERNE KUNST

View of “Cady Noland,” 2018–19. Foreground: Cady Noland, Dead Space, 1989. Background, from left: Kenneth C. Noland, Touch, 1963; Steven Parrino, Bent Painting, 1991. Photo: Axel Schneider.

1.

ON SECOND THOUGHT: What was she thinking?

What was she thinking about Lee Harvey Oswald or Charles Manson, Betty Ford or Jackie O.?

What was she thinking about the old red, white, and blue? About violence? About American history?

What was triggered in her thinking when it occurred to her (if it did) that Clement Greenberg curated both her mother and her father in their first big New York group show, “Emerging Talent,” in 1954, also the year Patricia Campbell Hearst was born—“Patty,” who emerges in the Museum für Moderne Kunst’s astounding survey “Cady Noland,” curated by Susanne Pfeffer in collaboration with the artist, as a soft young girl in a chapel and truncated cheerleader in Untitled (Patty in Church), 1991, and as “Tanya,” a gun-toting, Symbionese Liberation Army fugitive and FBI suspect, propped up like a Cineplex standee in Tanya as a Bandit, 1989 (cf. Nate Rodgers’s 1976

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