São Paulo

Tarsila do Amaral, Abaporu (The Man Who Eats), 1928, oil on canvas, 33 1⁄2 × 28 1⁄2".

Tarsila do Amaral

MASP - Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand

As part of a yearlong program dedicated to the art and histories of women, the exhibition “Tarsila Popular”—with a second official title, in English, “Tarsila do Amaral: Cannibalizing Modernism”—was the Museu de Arte de São Paulo’s first retrospective of one of Brazil’s most prominent and transgressive modernists. Known by her first name, Tarsila do Amoral (1886–1973) played a trailblazing role in reshaping the Eurocentric artistic traditions that were in place in Brazil at the beginning of the twentieth century to develop a visual language capable of capturing local cultures and narratives. Her iconic oil-on-canvas painting Abaporu (The Man Who Eats), 1928, on loan from the Latin American Art Museum of Buenos Aires for this exhibition, has come to symbolize the evolution of a new Brazilian aesthetic. Rendered in a bold palette, it depicts a gigantic human figure with a tiny head and

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the September 2019 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.