Lima, Peru

Agustina Valera, El mundo del Ayahuasca (The World of Ayahuasca), 2019, ceramic, 33 1⁄2 × 15 3⁄4 × 19 3⁄4". From “Dar forma al tiempo.”

Agustina Valera, El mundo del Ayahuasca (The World of Ayahuasca), 2019, ceramic, 33 1⁄2 × 15 3⁄4 × 19 3⁄4". From “Dar forma al tiempo.”

“Dar forma al tiempo”

Museo de Arte Contemporáneo

The Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Lima used to feel half-abandoned. Erected on the edge of a picturesque artificial pond in a beloved neighborhood park, it was immediately cursed with the resentment of the community it allegedly served. Since opening its doors in 2013, it has struggled to find its raison d’être. But since a major shakeup of the institution’s senior staff last year and the arrival of a new head curator, Giuliana Vidart its profile has started to change; word of her good work at the beleaguered museum has spread around town.

Dar forma al tiempo. Miradas contemporáneas a la cerámica precolombina” (Shaping Time: Contemporary Views of Pre-Columbian Ceramics) was the finest exhibition I have ever seen at the museum. Curated by Vidarte, it presented an intergenerational dialogue among Peruvian women artists working with the rich legacy and enduring influence of pre-Hispanic ceramics.

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