New York

View of “Mrinalini Mukherjee,” 2019. From left: Basanti, 1984; Yakshi, 1984; Pakshi, 1985; Rudra, 1982; Devi, 1982.

View of “Mrinalini Mukherjee,” 2019. From left: Basanti, 1984; Yakshi, 1984; Pakshi, 1985; Rudra, 1982; Devi, 1982.

Mrinalini Mukherjee

The Met Breuer

The retrospective at the Met Breuer of the late Indian sculptor Mrinalini Mukherjee (1949–2015) was also the first solo presentation of her art in the United States. Aptly titled “Phenomenal Nature,” the show—featuring nearly sixty objects, including her signature fiber sculptures and works in ceramic and bronze produced during the latter part of her career—was an overdue introduction to a formally audacious and technically exquisite oeuvre that defies easy art-historical and ethnographic classification. Although her engagement with textiles came in the wake of related midcentury investigations of fiber’s expressive potential by artists such as Jagoda Buić, Sheila Hicks, and Lenore Tawney, Mukherjee was working largely away from the cosmopolitan currents of the international art scene and along her own highly individual path. The startling biomorphic figures for which she is best

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