New York

Amy O’Neill, The Zoo Revolution, 2006–19, 16 mm transferred to HD video, color, sound, 4 minutes 42 seconds.

Amy O’Neill, The Zoo Revolution, 2006–19, 16 mm transferred to HD video, color, sound, 4 minutes 42 seconds.

Amy O’Neill

Paula Cooper Gallery | 521 West 21st Street

To behold a ruin is to bask in melancholia. Add misty, early-childhood memories and a primal, punk-metal soundtrack, and one sinks deep into the affective murk. Amy O’Neill concocted just such a heady brew of emotive stimuli for her first solo exhibition at Paula Cooper Gallery—a single four-and-a-half-minute video projection immingling original, observational footage; a chopped-up antique animation; and a pounding, growling, death-stalking lament by the now-defunct Brooklyn band Orphan, with whom the artist had previously collaborated.

The bedrock of the video—and the ruin running through its brief duration—is a rough-cut montage composed mostly of shaky-cam sweeps of an abandoned and somewhat hokey zoo and fantasy park (built 1962, closed 1995) located in rural Pennsylvania, intercut with slo-mo drive-bys through ragtag Rust Belt hamlets, presumably nearby. Shot in winter, the bleak

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