New York

View of “Berta Fischer,” 2019. From left: Gomolurin, 2019; Ubix, 2017; Petutula, 2019; Sokal, 2018.

View of “Berta Fischer,” 2019. From left: Gomolurin, 2019; Ubix, 2017; Petutula, 2019; Sokal, 2018.

Berta Fischer

James Fuentes

Berta Fischer’s show at the James Fuentes gallery felt like the happy wreckage of a good party. The Berlin-based artist’s polychromatic acrylic-glass and neon-and-rope sculptures summoned a never-ending celebration for the sheer fun of it: an invitation to enjoy light and prismatic trickery in gestural forms that (un)furled and posed seemingly at whim. The effect was carefree but not careless—each thermoformed piece was expertly manipulated into a dynamic biomorph or watery, melty planes. Fluidity was achieved with rigor.

Petutula, 2019, was the host with the most, constructed of fraternal twin parts suspended side by side from the ceiling like jaunty marionettes mid-jig; each one was about seven feet tall and strategically positioned to greet visitors. The durable material had the deceptively whispery appearance of cellophane cut into rounded and exclamatory frills that glimmered with cool

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