Florence

Gerold Miller, instant vision 156, 2019, lacquered aluminum, 110 1⁄4 × 110 1⁄4 × 5 7⁄8".

Gerold Miller, instant vision 156, 2019, lacquered aluminum, 110 1⁄4 × 110 1⁄4 × 5 7⁄8".

Gerold Miller

Eduardo Secci Contemporary

Gerold Miller’s work can be interpreted as existing within a continuous tension between object and space, within a relationship where the artist’s sculptures or wall pieces literally open up to the space that hosts them and deconstructs it. This show featured works in which the space actively breaks the unity of the surface, including examples from several of the thematic series the German artist has been producing for more than a decade. While Miller’s conceptual point of departure is painting, he subjects the fundamental two-dimensional code of pictorial expressiveness to a sort of genetic mutation by painting not on canvas but on aluminum supports, which he treats with brightly colored industrial lacquer, creating chromatic fields that are perfectly and above all mechanically defined.

This effect could be seen in five recent, variously sized works from the series “total object,” 2008–19,

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