Minneapolis

Dyani White Hawk, Untitled (Quiet Strength I), 2015, acrylic on canvas, 42 × 42".

Dyani White Hawk, Untitled (Quiet Strength I), 2015, acrylic on canvas, 42 × 42".

“Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists”

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts

There was much to commend in “Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists,” a survey of one thousand years of art by Indigenous women through 125 works. The exhibition didn’t rely on the usual curatorial model, in which non-Native curators assemble Indigenous art based on geographic or formal affinities, sometimes with a small group of Indigenous advisers to legitimize their efforts. At the Minneapolis Institute of Art, curators Jill Ahlberg Yohe and Teri Greeves, the latter a Kiowa artist, worked with nineteen advisers, the majority of whom were Indigenous artists, curators, and scholars. Their endeavor centered consensus: The advisers not only determined who would be part of the exhibition but also coauthored the catalogue. The curators also made an important claim: that the majority of Native American cultural belongings and artifacts held in museums were made by women—something Yohe

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