London

Lois Dodd, Front Door Cushing, 1982, oil on linen, 60 × 36".

Lois Dodd, Front Door Cushing, 1982, oil on linen, 60 × 36".

Lois Dodd

Modern Art Helmet Row

She finds great company in aloneness. A strip of light beneath a closed door; colors flapping from a clothesline; gray raindrops squiggling down a city window; a snowy, headlit hill; a lunar eclipse. For more than seventy years, Lois Dodd has lent a generous presence to mostly unpeopled views in or near her homes in New York, New Jersey, and midcoastal Maine. Associated with a set of postwar painters including Gretna Campbell, Alex Katz, and Neil Welliver—artists who, amid AbEx and Pop hegemony, courted gentle contrarianism by reengaging landscape painting via airily abstract modes of perception—she continues, at ninety-two, to work without proper institutional recognition despite her obvious genius. This show was her first survey abroad, its twenty canvases spanning half a century in two rooms. The mood was one of exceptional patience, and yet the images’ doors, windows, and mirrors—Dodd

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