New York

Paulina Peavy and Lacamo, Untitled, ca. 1945–ca. 1980, oil on board, 72 × 48".

Paulina Peavy and Lacamo, Untitled, ca. 1945–ca. 1980, oil on board, 72 × 48".

Paulina Peavy and Lacamo

Andrew Edlin Gallery

Paulina Peavy (1901–1999), an artist who witnessed nearly a century of culture flash before her eyes, was hardly recognized in her lifetime for her abstractions. Perhaps that’s because she never conformed to reigning styles and instead remained devoted to her own inner voice—or, rather, a voice from a higher dimension. Nearly all of Peavy’s works were made in collaboration with a nonhuman entity named Lacamo. She often channeled this “ghost spirit” while wearing magnificently jeweled masks that she designed, several of which held court in the back room of the Andrew Edlin Gallery this fall. The show, curated by Bill Arning, gathered enough of Peavy and Lacamo’s paintings and works on paper to build a solid case for why their art needs to be reconsidered anew, particularly given the recent revivals of works by the visionaries Hilma af Klint and Agnes Pelton.

In 1932, Peavy began attending

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