Mexico City

Cristina Tufiño, Dancing at the End of the World, 2019, polymer clay, each approx. 9 × 4 × 8 1⁄2".

Cristina Tufiño, Dancing at the End of the World, 2019, polymer clay, each approx. 9 × 4 × 8 1⁄2".

Cristina Tufiño

Galeria Agustina Ferreyra

“It matters what ideas we use to think other ideas,” according to the anthropologist Marilyn Strathern, as quoted by Donna J. Haraway in her 2016 book Staying with the Trouble. This sentence reverberated in my mind as I walked through Cristina Tufiño’s first solo show in Mexico. Titled “Dancing at the End of the World,” the exhibition was spun from many ideas, and from materials both solid and incorporeal: first of all, from a scent, a nostalgic, luxuriant, almost funerary aroma concocted by the Escuela del Olor (School of Smell), a Puerto Rican project run by Adelaida Ortiz-Chiqués and Chaveli Sifre that explores the fragrances of the Caribbean. The scent floated over a medley of pastel-hued ceramic sculptures holding court on the floor, Constellation Sunset (Cubetas del Atardecer) (Buckets at Sunset) (all works 2019). They were reminiscent of thick, hard plastic paint tubs, but petite,

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