Rio de Janeiro

Djanira da Motta e Silva, Vendedora de flores (Flower Seller), 1947, oil on canvas, 39 5⁄8 × 25 5⁄8".

Djanira da Motta e Silva, Vendedora de flores (Flower Seller), 1947, oil on canvas, 39 5⁄8 × 25 5⁄8".

Djanira da Motta e Silva

Casa Roberto Marinho

Originating at the Museu de Arte de São Paulo and organized by Rodrigo Moura and Isabella Rjeille, this exhibition of works by Djanira da Motta e Silva (1914–1979)—or simply Djanira, as she is more commonly known—showcased nearly four decades of paintings by the primarily self-taught artist of working-class origin and indigenous ancestry. Often dismissed as “naive” or “primitive” (one American reviewer observed that a painting of hers would look at home on the cover of a New Yorker), the artist’s oeuvre has been symbolically effaced from the canon of Brazilian art, lending all the more the importance to “Djanira: a memória de seu povo” (“Djanira: The Memory of Her People,” though the exhibition used the divergent English title “Djanira: Picturing Brazil”) and its accompanying catalogue, which was edited by the curators together with Adriano Pedrosa.

Djanira’s trajectory begins amid the

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