London

James Rosenquist, Coenties Slip Studio, 1961, oil on canvas and shaped hardboard, 34 × 43".

James Rosenquist, Coenties Slip Studio, 1961, oil on canvas and shaped hardboard, 34 × 43".

James Rosenquist

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac | London

Has there been a more falsely idealized decade than the 1960s? Mass consumerism, the collapse of “high” and “low” art, celebrity worship: All seem a prelude to today’s blank monoculture. Pop art trademarked the zeitgeist with an instant visual vocabulary—from Andy Warhol’s soup cans to Roy Lichtenstein’s comic-strip teardrops—endlessly recycled in the amnesiac twenty-first century.

James Rosenquist (1933–2017) was a jolting outlier. Though he ran with the same New York crowd as Robert Rauschenberg and Warhol (who once called Rosenquist his favorite artist), he’s eluded the same level of “brand” status as many of his contemporaries—at least on this side of the pond. “Visualising the Sixties,” an exhibition of Rosenquist’s work from that pivotal decade, made a bold case for his continuing relevance. Turning an oblique eye on the American dream, Rosenquist’s oeuvre balances the brash signifiers

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