São Paulo

Marepe, Satélite baldio (Vacant Satellite), 2006–2007, buckets, screws, 118 1⁄8 × 118 1⁄8 × 118 1⁄8".

Marepe, Satélite baldio (Vacant Satellite), 2006–2007, buckets, screws, 118 1⁄8 × 118 1⁄8 × 118 1⁄8".

Marepe

Pinacoteca do Estado / Estação Pinacoteca

The Brazilian artist Marepe has been called a regional Surrealist and a Bahian Duchamp. He draws on a range of Surrealist strategies to produce his readymade-based works, or “necéssaires,” as he calls them. Dislocation, condensation, repetition, transposition, and puns both visual and linguistic are all part of his process. The thirty-three pieces on view in the large-scale solo exhibition “Marepe: estranhamente comum” (Marepe: Oddly Common) included assemblage, sculpture, video, photography, drawing, and painting, but installations predominated, often combining natural materials such as wood and clay with mass-produced plastic, metal, and rubber. While the smaller works were typically fleeting and ludic, the concatenations of wordplay and form in Marepe’s haunting installations rendered the complexities of Brazil’s sociocultural landscape with sly lucidity.

Take, for example, the installation

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