London

Moyra Davey, i confess, 2019, HD video, color, sound, 56 minutes 46 seconds.

Moyra Davey, i confess, 2019, HD video, color, sound, 56 minutes 46 seconds.

Moyra Davey

greengrassi

It’s unusual to find oneself on a London evening immersed in French Canadian politics of the 1960s and ’70s, but this was where Moyra Davey’s new film, i confess, 2019, placed me. I felt like I had been jettisoned from the streets of Kennington back to Ottawa, where I spent my childhood, or to Montreal, where Davey spent hers. These cities are shaped by conflicts of inheritance, origin, ownership, identity, and language—primarily French and/or/versus English. Much of i confess (which takes its title from Alfred Hitchcock’s 1953 film of the same name) is filmed, like many of Davey’s works, inside her apartment in New York. Within this familiar space, Davey conjures another world entirely, along with its political and historical concerns: the province of Quebec and its French-speaking borderlands. The film also acts as a province of memory—a reckoning?—so that watching it is like being

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and receive the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the December 2019 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.