Hamburg

Sarah Abu Abdallah, The Salad Zone, 2013, video, color, sound, 21 minutes 27 seconds.

Sarah Abu Abdallah, The Salad Zone, 2013, video, color, sound, 21 minutes 27 seconds.

Sarah Abu Abdallah

Kunstverein in Hamburg

When a woman from Saudi Arabia makes art, the global—which is to say, Western-dominated—art world typically expects her work to confront and denounce the oppression of women in her country. Sarah Abu Abdallah subverts this expectation. Although she addresses the everyday lives of Saudi women, she sets the macropolitical mechanisms of systematic oppression aside to focus on the microcosm of the private sphere, where her subjects come into contact with the wider world via the internet. The video pieces Abu Abdallah presented, together with an installation and a painting in her first solo show in Europe accordingly directed our attention to seemingly mundane yet ultimately unsettling scenes of domestic life.

In one recent three-channel video, The House That Ate Them Whole, 2018, the camera sweeps the interior of a villa in claustrophobic tracking shots, the architecture appearing in oddly

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