Madrid

View of “André Romão,” 2019. From left: Pierna izquierda (Left Leg), 2019; Cabeza (el hambre del monstruo) (Head [The Monster’s Hunger]), 2019.

View of “André Romão,” 2019. From left: Pierna izquierda (Left Leg), 2019; Cabeza (el hambre del monstruo) (Head [The Monster’s Hunger]), 2019.

André Romão

garcía | galería

One need only turn to Ovid to confirm that hybrid forms are nothing new in art. States of in-betweenness have always aroused fascination because they unsettle the categories we use to comprehend the world, throwing taxonomies of human, animal, and plant into flux. And while our ideas about the natural and the artificial have changed a great deal since the Roman poet’s Metamorphoses, the Lisbon-born artist André Romão’s latest exhibition, “Flores” (Flowers), proved that it is still possible to trouble the taxonomical waters.

The exhibition staged a selection of interspecies assemblages on a white dais, mounted low to the ground in the main gallery space. The arrangement recalled a window display while also delineating a clear progression, starting with Moonrise (all works 2019), a thin circle of blue Plexiglas suspended on a transparent thread so that it twirled with the comings and goings

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