São Paulo

Cildo Meireles, Olvido (Oblivion) (detail), 1987–89, mixed media, 16' 8 3⁄4“ × 27' 6 3⁄4” × 27' 6 3⁄4".

Cildo Meireles, Olvido (Oblivion) (detail), 1987–89, mixed media, 16' 8 3⁄4“ × 27' 6 3⁄4” × 27' 6 3⁄4".

Cildo Meireles

SESC | Pompéia

Titled “Entrevendo” (Glimpsing), this career survey of the work of the Brazilian Conceptual artist Cildo Meireles includes pieces from the mid-1960s to the present. It focuses on installations that involve many senses at once. While a good number of the artist’s best-known works—for instance, the series “Inserções em circuitos ideológicos” (Insertions into Ideological Circuits), 1970–, in which antiestablishment slogans are inscribed on banknotes and returnable Coke bottles so as to circulate freely—aren’t synesthetic, certain iconic installations are. Olvido (Oblivion), 1987–89, is a tepee covered in roughly six thousand banknotes, encircled by some seventy thousand candles. Three tons of ox bones fill the circle’s pit. Painted black on the inside, the tent is partly filled with charcoal. The noise of an electric saw emerges from it, but to investigate the sound, one must come close and

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