Sheboygan

View of “In Poetry and Silence: The Work and Studio of Lenore Tawney,” 2019–20. Hanging, top right: In Utero, 1985.

View of “In Poetry and Silence: The Work and Studio of Lenore Tawney,” 2019–20. Hanging, top right: In Utero, 1985.

Lenore Tawney

John Michael Kohler Arts Center

View of “In Poetry and Silence: The Work and Studio of Lenore Tawney,” 2019–20. Hanging, top right: In Utero, 1985.

IN 1957, at the age of fifty, Lenore Tawney (1907–2007) left Chicago and moved to 27 Coenties Slip in New York to begin creating the second half of her pioneering oeuvre. Prior to her move, she had studied with Alexander Archipenko, László Moholy-Nagy, Emerson Woelffer, and Marli Ehrman at the Institute of Design in Chicago, and with Finnish textile artist Martta Taipale in North Carolina. These experiences shaped her early career as a weaver skilled enough to develop a diaphanous, nonhorizontal, drawing-like technique dubbed “open-warp.” In the catalogue for her current show at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center, critic and craft-and-design historian Glenn Adamson sums up the significance of Tawney’s truly novel, even radical, contribution: “The reader might well wonder why—after millennia of textile production—she was the first to adopt such an apparently simple technical

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. Please sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW and save up to 65% off the newsstand price for full online access to this issue and our archive.

Order the PRINT EDITION of the January 2020 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.