reviews

  • Mark Leckey, Dream English Kid, 1964–1999 AD, 2015, video, color, sound, 23 minutes 2 seconds.

    Mark Leckey, Dream English Kid, 1964–1999 AD, 2015, video, color, sound, 23 minutes 2 seconds.

    Mark Leckey

    Tate Britain

    Amazingly, a life-size section of the M53 motorway bridge—complete with massive pillars, a ramp, and an overhead road—has been reconstructed in a darkened, hangar-size gallery at Tate Britain. Beneath such a bridge, located in the hinterlands of Liverpool, Mark Leckey played with his boyhood friends back in the 1970s. And there, he says, one very strange day, he encountered an inexplicable, spritelike magical creature.

    This supernatural encounter lodged indelibly in Leckey’s psyche and has loosely become the subject of Under Under In, 2019, one of three video works that comprise “Mark Leckey: O’

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  • Andrea Büttner, Deutsche Bundesbank Dining Room, 2019, cardboard, book-binding linen, 8 1⁄4 × 29 3⁄4 × 20 7⁄8".

    Andrea Büttner, Deutsche Bundesbank Dining Room, 2019, cardboard, book-binding linen, 8 1⁄4 × 29 3⁄4 × 20 7⁄8".

    Andrea Büttner

    Hollybush Gardens

    High overhead in the blue, barrel-vaulted firmament: potatoes. Painted, not real. Of the versatile tuber, Andrea Büttner has said they are “what maybe Duchamp would have called a ‘prime word.’ Within art there are forms that can be poo, or bread, or a potato, so they are kind of ambiguous primal shapes.”And here they were, on the gallery ceiling, twinkling, transubstantiated spuds in a field of precious ultramarine. “We have,” they seemed to say with a knowing wink, “transcended our earthly stature.” Büttner’s work has long been invested in probing theologically inflected binaries (high and low,

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  • Christodoulos Panayiotou, Bastardo, 2018, spray paint on marble, 17 3⁄4 × 63 × 18 7⁄8".

    Christodoulos Panayiotou, Bastardo, 2018, spray paint on marble, 17 3⁄4 × 63 × 18 7⁄8".

    Christodoulos Panayiotou

    Camden Arts Centre

    The troubled island of Great Britain has not seen a great deal of work by the troubled-island specialist Christodoulos Panayiotou until now: “Act II: The Island” is his first major UK solo show. A really good one, too—a bouquet of seductive, resonant works, sheerly articulate through their visual and physical presence, plus a booklet of contextual glosses intrinsic to Panayiotou’s practice but of questionable utility. By removing most of the doors on the Camden Arts Centre’s exhibition floor and tucking works into places normally out of bounds, Panayiotou de- and reterritorialized the space,

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