reviews

  • Liz Glynn, Affirmative Consent, 2019, figurative element: enamel, bronze, 30 × 48 × 45".

    Liz Glynn, Affirmative Consent, 2019, figurative element: enamel, bronze, 30 × 48 × 45".

    Liz Glynn

    Vielmetter Los Angeles

    On the heels of her sprawling, multisensory “sculptural experience” at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, “The Archaeology of Another Possible Future” (2017–19), Liz Glynn’s first exhibition at Vielmetter Los Angeles, intriguingly titled “Emotional Capital,” represented a shift in perspective: The earlier exhibition was populated with site-specific interactive sculptures in monumental materials, such as forklift pallets and shipping containers, that constituted a meditation on postindustrialization. Here, the twenty-two prints and sculptures dotting the gallery suggested less a coherent

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  • Jónsi, Hvítblinda (Whiteout), 2019, twelve-channel sound installation (20 minutes), ten speakers, two subwoofers, aluminum, LED lighting, ozone scent. Installation view.

    Jónsi, Hvítblinda (Whiteout), 2019, twelve-channel sound installation (20 minutes), ten speakers, two subwoofers, aluminum, LED lighting, ozone scent. Installation view.

    Jónsi

    Tanya Bonakdar Gallery | Los Angeles

    Even if you have a fondness for the paintings of, say, Bob Dylan, you might find it difficult to argue for their historical significance. “Show people” tend to treat the visual-art context as a place to unload their doodles—or, worse, they superficially conform to the latest standards of aesthetic production. It is therefore with some trepidation that one might approach a show by the lead singer and guitarist of the Icelandic band Sigur Rós. Jónsi is a bona fide rock star, though not lacking in visual fluency, having recently collaborated with such figures as Doug Aitken and Olafur Eliasson.

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  • View of “Postcommodity,” 2020. Both works: untitled, 2019.

    View of “Postcommodity,” 2020. Both works: untitled, 2019.

    Postcommodity

    LAXART

    For “Some Reach While Others Clap,” Postcommodity took LAX-ART’s structures, both physical and organizational, as its material. Near the entrance, two of the building’s load-bearing H beams had been painted (or, in the parlance of custom-car culture, “candied”) in glittering tones of interlocking shapes, one in teals and blues and the other in vibrant pinks and reds. To make this work, the collective (currently comprised of Cristóbal Martínez and Kade L. Twist) enlisted Edgar Hernandez, president of Starlite Rod & Kustom, an autobody shop in Los Angeles renowned in magazines such as the now-defunct

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  • Xin Liu, Living Distance—two-channel video, 2019, two-channel HD video, color, sound, 10 minutes 49 seconds.

    Xin Liu, Living Distance—two-channel video, 2019, two-channel HD video, color, sound, 10 minutes 49 seconds.

    Xin Liu

    Make Room

    In 1957, the Soviets loaded a dog named Laika onto the Sputnik 2 spacecraft. Laika was a stray, probably part Samoyed and part terrier. She had a little spotted face with intelligent eyes and a white stripe streaking down to her soft, dark nose. Much international fanfare accompanied Laika’s flight into earth’s orbit, some two thousand miles above her home. She died a day or two after the launch, possibly from overheating.

    Xin Liu’s new show at Make Room, “Living/Distance,” did not at first hit the observer with the pathos of that Cold War space flight, but the results of the artist’s own

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  • Aram Saroyan, Untitled (7), 2019, permanent marker on paper, 18 × 24".

    Aram Saroyan, Untitled (7), 2019, permanent marker on paper, 18 × 24".

    Aram Saroyan

    as-is.la

    Seventeen drawings hung level, a rectangle of fluorescent lights suspended from the ceiling, two doorways, in and out. In such a sparse show, one couldn’t help but tally the components. Along the walls of the gallery, the framed works on paper were installed snugly, flirting with the room’s corners, stressing the space’s rectangularity. The drawings, however, were colorful portals abiding by their own physics. Squiggly pathways drawn with markers in combinations of bright colors boldly traversed the pages. While childlike in their medium, the works suggested profound meditations, as if they had

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