Madrid

Ludovica Carbotta, Severe UD 01, 2019, wood, iron, paint, plastic. Installation view.

Ludovica Carbotta, Severe UD 01, 2019, wood, iron, paint, plastic. Installation view.

Ludovica Carbotta

Galería Marta Cervera

Fortresses are generally designed to protect against external threats. A less common (though perhaps more poetic) reason to build a fort is to confine something dangerous within it, protecting those outside. This was the purpose of the gunpowder storehouse at Forte Marghera, a nineteenth-century fortification on the Venice Lagoon that is now an art space. Known as the Austrian Polveriera, this building last year, in the context of the 2019 Venice Biennale, housed the works from Ludovica Carbotta’s ongoing series “Monowe,” 2016–, that were reconfigured (along with drawings for other sculptures not on view) for her recent exhibition, “Objects of defence,” in Madrid.

The artist—Italian born and now based in Barcelona—reimagines the powder keg as a mental chamber where the brain encapsulates problems from which it wants to protect the rest of the body. Rendered sculptural, these defensive

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