New York

Annabel Daou, WHEN IN THE COURSE OF HUMAN EVENTS (detail), 2019–20, ink and correction fluid on paper, dimensions variable.

Annabel Daou, WHEN IN THE COURSE OF HUMAN EVENTS (detail), 2019–20, ink and correction fluid on paper, dimensions variable.

Annabel Daou

Signs and Symbols

Although political discourse contains language that is seemingly direct, it is subject to endless interpretation and reinterpretation. Take the Declaration of Independence’s “All men are created equal,” which has been quoted with rhetorical flourish by American civil rights icons including Martin Luther King Jr., Abraham Lincoln, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. In a 2009 interview, Donald Trump—a willfully obtuse man who is barely literate—called the statement “very confusing.” This ugly moment foreshadowed his presidency, one that is bolstered by supporters—such as White Lives Matter, among other hateful movements—who have appropriated the terminology of disenfranchisement to uphold the status quo of white supremacy. Politicians always bend words to their will, but Trumpers twist them into perversions of decency and truth.

For her solo exhibition at signs and symbols, the Beirut-born, New

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. Please sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW and save up to 65% off the newsstand price for full online access to this issue and our archive.

Order the PRINT EDITION of the April 2020 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.