New York

Alison Rossiter, Density 1930s (Gevaert Gevaluxe Velours), 2019, four gelatin silver prints, each 8 1⁄2 × 6 1⁄2".

Alison Rossiter, Density 1930s (Gevaert Gevaluxe Velours), 2019, four gelatin silver prints, each 8 1⁄2 × 6 1⁄2".

Alison Rossiter

Yossi Milo Gallery

“Every photograph is a certificate of presence,” wrote Roland Barthes in his 1980 book Camera Lucida, the final and most personal of his many engagements with the medium. The presences Barthes had in mind—an ancient house, a table set for dinner, strangers and loved ones—were at once corporeal and temporal, representing specific moments of physical tangibility fixed precisely in time by light and chemistry. The elegant, conceptually expansive work of Alison Rossiter also conjures extraordinary ordinary presences, but of a very different kind. Since 2007, the artist has been collecting expired vintage photographic paper and developing it using basic black-and-white processes. The cameraless pictures she produces may be depopulated, but they are by no means without subjects. The interactions between her latent materials and their darkroom baths yield a surprisingly rich range of abstract

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