reviews

  • Alina Szapocznikow, Noga (Leg), 1962, plaster, 7 7⁄8 × 19 5⁄8 × 25".

    Alina Szapocznikow, Noga (Leg), 1962, plaster, 7 7⁄8 × 19 5⁄8 × 25".

    Alina Szapocznikow

    Hauser & Wirth London | Savile Row

    I didn’t know it at the time, but the day I went to see “To Exalt the Ephemeral: Alina Szapocznikow, 1962–1972” would be, in light of the Covid-19 lockdown, my last day on the streets of London for a long time. Soon, we would be told to hide our bodies away, sick and healthy alike, until . . . I didn’t know when. At the gallery, I encountered striking evidence of the human body in all manner of states: ailing, productive, joyful, anarchic, in pieces, enduring. The word indexicality well describes the turn Szapocznikow’s works took in the decade leading up to her death in 1973. Their forms not

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  • Christine Rebet, Brand Band News, 2005, three-channel animation, 35 mm transferred to HD, color, sound, 3 minutes 21 seconds.

    Christine Rebet, Brand Band News, 2005, three-channel animation, 35 mm transferred to HD, color, sound, 3 minutes 21 seconds.

    Christine Rebet

    Parasol unit

    Christine Rebet’s animated film The Square, 2011, glowed in a small darkened room. Like all of the artist’s films (each just minutes long), this work is formed from thousands of hand-prepared still images, shot in 16 or 35 mm and thrust into movement. The Square invokes Samuel Beckett’s 1981 television piece Quad, echoing the synchronized footsteps of Quad’s four dancers and the palette of their hooded costumes. With hand-laid trails of powdered wood, metal, plaster, and clay, Rebet’s work traces the agonies of confinement and incarceration, while alluding to the simple, ennobling act of the

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  • Joey Holder, Semelparous, 2020, still from the 7-minute, 47-second 4K video component of a mixed-media installation additionally comprising digital prints, wood, MDF, and paint.

    Joey Holder, Semelparous, 2020, still from the 7-minute, 47-second 4K video component of a mixed-media installation additionally comprising digital prints, wood, MDF, and paint.

    Joey Holder

    Springhealth Leisure Center

    By the time female European eels complete their three-thousand-mile, one-to-two-year-long swim from the continent’s rivers back to the Sargasso Sea to spawn, they’ve devoured most of their own skeletons and muscle mass and basically resemble mobile sacks of eggs. Eels are semelparous, meaning they reproduce only once during their lifetime, investing all their energy, body weight, and existential drive (so to speak) in that single journey.

    Although European eels are critically endangered (their population is down by roughly 90 percent since the 1970s in great part due to illegal overfishing), Joey

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