Los Angeles

View of “Psychic Plumbing,” 2020. Background: Sara Ludy, Channels, 2019. Foreground: Philip Peters, Fault Lines and Freeways, 2020.

View of “Psychic Plumbing,” 2020. Background: Sara Ludy, Channels, 2019. Foreground: Philip Peters, Fault Lines and Freeways, 2020.

“Psychic Plumbing”

Canary

On the white landing page of the website www.thecanarytest.com, two surveillance-style live feeds appeared side by side and a time signature gave the current hour, minute, and second in Pacific Standard Time. The cameras were trained on Canary, a new downtown off-space housed in a former clothing store. One was positioned at the front of the long narrow space and the other at the back, where metal racks and clothes hangers were still installed. The gallery’s inaugural show, “Psychic Plumbing,” existed in these two locations: the physical space and its 24/7 broadcast online. But this past March, after Canary was forced to close its doors due to the Covid-19 pandemic, only the online iteration remained accessible, broadcasting the still and silent room.

“Psychic Plumbing” attempted to probe “invisible systems, queer inversions, and psychogeographies” through the work of Stevie Cisneros Hanley,

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