Cologne

Wade Guyton, The Devil’s Hole, 1999, two C-prints mounted on wood, each 29 5⁄8 × 19 1⁄2 × 11 1⁄4".

Wade Guyton, The Devil’s Hole, 1999, two C-prints mounted on wood, each 29 5⁄8 × 19 1⁄2 × 11 1⁄4".

Wade Guyton

Museum Ludwig

Wade Guyton, The Devil’s Hole, 1999, two C-prints mounted on wood, each 29 5⁄8 × 19 1⁄2 × 11 1⁄4".

Curated by Yilmaz Dziewior with Leonie Radine

THE DEVIL’S HOLE is a view into the abyss. The diptych’s two panels depict reddish light transforming layers of rock into the twists and folds of a bodily orifice, before vanishing in the dark of fathomless depths. It is an empty center, a mysterious receptacle for our projections. The hole, a water-filled cave in Tennessee, is not just an attraction for tourists and scientists. It evokes images of a mythical underworld and triggers thoughts of psychoanalysis and Plato. It conjures the expansionist bravado of Land art and suggests an anal variation of the origin fantasies of aesthetic modernism found in the work of Gustave Courbet, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Marcel Duchamp. Taken from different angles, the photographs, which date from 1999, hung on the wall side by side and stared at us like two empty eyes. It is a bifurcated point of origin,

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