Newburgh

View of “Zsófia Keresztes,” 2020. From left: Easy targets, heavy bites I, 2020; The Failure, 2020.

View of “Zsófia Keresztes,” 2020. From left: Easy targets, heavy bites I, 2020; The Failure, 2020.

Zsófia Keresztes

Elijah Wheat Showroom

Five years ago, the artist Audrey Wollen shook the internet with her “Sad Girl Theory,” proposing the notion of female sadness as a mode of politicized resistance that runs counter to the “lean-in” rhetoric of empowerment feminism. In her photo series “Repetition,” 2014–15, Wollen re-created artworks made by men, in which she posed as moody, modern versions of art history’s female muses. (One image shows Wollen from behind, lounging nude in bed like Ingres’s odalisque. She gazes at her laptop webcam, while the front of her body is displayed on the screen.) The reception to this project was polarizing, and some chalked up Wollen’s self-objectification to mere narcissism, social-media style. Now, vulnerability and empathy are currencies to be mined online. Of course, they are qualities that seem most valuable when embraced by young, attractive influencers, who avoid the messiness of systemic

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