Mexico City

Lewis Hammond, Attachment, 2020, oil on linen, 32 × 51".

Lewis Hammond, Attachment, 2020, oil on linen, 32 × 51".

Lewis Hammond

Lulu

Looking at Lewis Hammond’s deeply introverted works online before I ventured out of the house earlier this summer to see his show “Still Life,” I could imagine the oil paint recoiling from the overhead fluorescent lights, suspecting their glare would cover entire sections of the canvas with a flat, pale sheen. In the flesh, however, the paintings are fleshy, or flesh-threatening: cuddles, thorns, knives, bites, and spikes. The British artist’s works are big, their depictions intense. His images looked out of place in a tiny gallery that mostly specializes in small-format works.

In Kyur (all works cited, 2020), a couple lies hugging at the bottom of the canvas, surrounded by a sturdy wall as well as by the shade and golden hue of an afternoon. But the sense of restfulness was complicated by what one saw in the surrounding canvases: prickly white acacia branches in the diptych The Alcovene

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