Boston

Rami George, Untitled (with my father), 2020, HD video, color, sound, 20 minutes 30 seconds.

Rami George, Untitled (with my father), 2020, HD video, color, sound, 20 minutes 30 seconds.

Rami George

MIT List Visual Arts Center

In the early 1990s, Nelli George began receiving pamphlets in the mail from a place called the Samaritan Foundation. Nelli was a ceramist and homemaker who lived in Somerville, Massachusetts, with her husband, Jonathan, and their two young children, Leila Malini and Rami. The foundation, led by a woman named Linda Greene, was a new-age religious sect that practiced, among other things, pendulum dowsing—an occult technique that can be used for divination or even clearing out evil energies from everyday objects. (Greene also believed that Hillary Clinton was a “three-virtue type zombie” and that telephones were used by vampires to drain unsuspecting people of their life force.) Intrigued by the group’s teachings, Nelli moved her children to its headquarters in Guthrie, Oklahoma, a former jail that the foundation dubbed the Monastery. What began as Nelli’s private, obsessive quest for spiritual

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