New York

Robert Gober, Hanging Man/Sleeping Man, 1989, silk screen on paper, 85 1⁄2 × 29 1⁄2".

Robert Gober, Hanging Man/Sleeping Man, 1989, silk screen on paper, 85 1⁄2 × 29 1⁄2".

Robert Gober

Matthew Marks Gallery

It took a pandemic for dreaming to become a common concern again. But Robert Gober never lost interest. For nearly four decades, his art has mined the movement from consciousness to the unconscious and back again, giving us a novel thought landscape: wax objects sprouting a fine layer of human hair, sinks sans faucets, and uncannily detailed sculptures of domestic items. Examples of each were included in this online survey of twenty works, made between 1976 and 2019, alongside related content. At the top of the site was the chimeric Death Mask, 2008, a ten-inch-high plaster amalgamation of the artist’s face and that of his dog Paco, who passed away unexpectedly. With its hauntingly static blue eyes, long snout, and pale-red lips, the image underscored Gober’s ongoing examination of the preservation of memory, history, and loss through an innovative take on facades and persona, a word

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