Melbourne

Alex Cuffe, When the anaesthetic wore off the lights were so bright . . . the only thing they could offer was this washcloth . . . I woke up screaming . . . all they could offer was this washcloth . . . the first words I remember were addressed to a body of a different gender . . . I held the nurses hand smiling while my first words were to correct her . . . and all I have left is a washcloth that will never be clean, 2019, cotton cloth, hair dye, 17 3/4 × 13 3/4".

Alex Cuffe, When the anaesthetic wore off the lights were so bright . . . the only thing they could offer was this washcloth . . . I woke up screaming . . . all they could offer was this washcloth . . . the first words I remember were addressed to a body of a different gender . . . I held the nurses hand smiling while my first words were to correct her . . . and all I have left is a washcloth that will never be clean, 2019, cotton cloth, hair dye, 17 3/4 × 13 3/4".

Alex Cuffe

TCB Art Inc.

Crying selfies are frequently derided by those who cannot reconcile genuine grief with the broadcast culture of social media. For them, a crying selfie, like a “sleeping” selfie, reveals only its own disingenuity. Performative happiness is tolerable, but performative grief is suspect. Ambivalent to this binary pairing, “Love is the Length of her Hair” pivoted around an archive of crying selfies that Alex Cuffe has taken over the past five years, the period of time that encompasses her gender transition. She selected forty-three of these camera-phone photographs and had them digitally printed on cheap white T-shirts, which were displayed dangling from black-plastic coat hangers on a clothes rack in the gallery. Viewers were invited to thumb through the T-shirts and even purchase one such token of her sorrow.

As affect theorist Ann Cvetkovich has suggested, depression and related states of

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