London

Khadija Saye, Limoŋ, 2017, silk screen on vinyl, 24 1/8 × 19 3/4". © The Estate of Khadija Saye.

Khadija Saye, Limoŋ, 2017, silk screen on vinyl, 24 1/8 × 19 3/4". © The Estate of Khadija Saye.

Khadija Saye

236 Westbourne Grove

More than seventy people perished in the Grenfell Tower blaze of June 2017, when a fire began in a fourth-floor apartment and, owing to the building’s treacherously inflammable exterior cladding, rapidly spread to engulf the entire social-housing tower. Among the dead was British Gambian artist Khadija Saye, at home with her mother on the twentieth floor, presumably obeying the firefighters’ advice to stay put until help arrived. Only twenty-four years old when she tragically died, Saye was “on the cusp of something special,” as London Member of Parliament David Lammy said at the momentous unveiling of “Breath is Invisible,” an on-street exhibition of nine poster-size self-portraits. At the time of her death, six photographs from this series were on view at the recently opened Venice Biennale Diaspora Pavilion, where she was the youngest participant.

In Venice the photos were small-scale

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