reviews

  • Elsa Guillaume, Tritons VIII, 2020, ceramic, 21 1/4 × 17 3/4 × 25 1/2". From the series “Tritons,” 2020.

    Elsa Guillaume, Tritons VIII, 2020, ceramic, 21 1/4 × 17 3/4 × 25 1/2". From the series “Tritons,” 2020.

    Elsa Guillaume

    BACKSLASH

    As its taxonomic title indicated, Elsa Guillaume’s recent show “Tritonades & coelacanthe” (Tritons & Coelacanth) was teeming with prehistoric-looking newts and fish. The artist’s interest in these species lies in their relationship to the evolutionary aquatic-to-terrestrial migration made by vertebrates millions of years ago. The coelacanth (once thought to have gone extinct before being rediscovered in the mid-twentieth century) is a transitional organism that links lobe-finned fish to tetrapods. Tritons, commonly known as newts, migrate from water to land over the course of their lifetimes.

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  • Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2020 (the odious smell of truth) (three flags, 1958), 2020, marble, 30 5/8 × 45 1/2 × 2 1/2".

    Rirkrit Tiravanija, untitled 2020 (the odious smell of truth) (three flags, 1958), 2020, marble, 30 5/8 × 45 1/2 × 2 1/2".

    Rirkrit Tiravanija

    Galerie Chantal Crousel

    By the time Rirkrit Tiravanija moved to New York in 1982, Jasper Johns had been making his flag paintings for almost thirty years. For his new tapestries and marble works, Tiravanija has copied the elder artist’s maps and flags. Tiravanija produced his tapestries on the historic French looms of Pinton, manufacturers of works by such twentieth-century heavyweights as Calder and Picasso; his marble comes from the same veins of Carrara that supplied Michelangelo.

    While Tiravanija gained visibility in the 1990s for modest installations that privileged socializing and shared meals—essential rituals

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