reviews

  • Francesco Clemente, Two Trees, 2001, fresco (traditional pigments on honey comb panel plastered with fresh lime), 9' 10'' × 19' 8''.

    Francesco Clemente, Two Trees, 2001, fresco (traditional pigments on honey comb panel plastered with fresh lime), 9' 10'' × 19' 8''.

    Francesco Clemente

    Vito Schnabel Gallery at the Old Santa Monica Post Office

    “Twenty Years of Painting: 2001–2021” was the first show of Francesco Clemente’s work in Los Angeles in almost two decades. (The artist’s last outing, an elegiac 2003 Gagosian presentation that spanned New York and LA, offered a selection of then-recent works that conspicuously absented the human figure—a resonant meditation on loss.) Here, in a decommissioned and vacated Depression-era post office in Santa Monica, thirty pieces were spread across some fifteen thousand square feet of exhibition space. The spare Moderne interior, all rose marble and stained wood, supplied a surprisingly pitch-perfect

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  • Susan Cianciolo, Shabbat Shalom, 2021, mixed media, textiles, 58 1⁄2 × 50".

    Susan Cianciolo, Shabbat Shalom, 2021, mixed media, textiles, 58 1⁄2 × 50".

    Susan Cianciolo

    Overduin & Co.

    Susan Cianciolo’s second solo show at Overduin & Co.—“Transmission of energy from celestial alignment with galactic center: Run 13 Collection”—was as sprawling, intricate, and multidimensional as its title indicated. Across three separate spaces, visitors encountered the artist’s new Run 13 clothing collection; a selection of “costumes” (as Cianciolo refers to them) from the archive of Run lines, which viewers could browse on rolling racks; a room hung with mixed-media-on-canvas works, mostly from 2020; several 2D and 3D tapestry pieces that were made last year; a mobile; a healing station; and

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  • Lynne Marsh, Ninfa Atlas (detail), 2021, five-channel HD video installation, color, sound. Photo: David Hartwell.

    Lynne Marsh, Ninfa Atlas (detail), 2021, five-channel HD video installation, color, sound. Photo: David Hartwell.

    Lynne Marsh

    Barbara and Art Culver Center of the Arts

    Over the considerable course of her career, Canadian artist Lynne Marsh, who is still largely unknown in the United States, has produced just a few projects, all highly ambitious and meticulously realized. Four of these were included in “Who Raised It Up So Many Times,” a tightly executed survey of Marsh’s work, curated by Kimberli Meyer. Everything in this presentation seems to converge around a complex meditation on the nature—or, perhaps better, the character—of our gestures, especially those that we consider to be the most spontaneous, expressive, and free but that on second pass disclose

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