reviews

  • View of “Ser Pallay,” 2021–22. Kunan Pallaykuna (Contemporary Andean Textile Iconography) (detail), 2021. Photo: Miguel Palomino.

    View of “Ser Pallay,” 2021–22. Kunan Pallaykuna (Contemporary Andean Textile Iconography) (detail), 2021. Photo: Miguel Palomino.

    “Ser Pallay”

    Vigil Gonzales

    In Latin America, as elsewhere, Indigenous-made objects such as ceramics and textiles have typically been excluded from contemporary art spaces and relegated to the category of folk art. This situation has shifted in recent years, as the region’s most visible museums and galleries have turned their attention to Indigenous arts, echoing global calls to decolonize the art world. Long before this shift, Quechua weaver Nilda Callañaupa created the Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco (CTTC) in Cusco to highlight Indigenous arts’ multilayered histories and their renewal. The recent show “Ser

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