reviews

  • View of “Decriminalised Futures,” 2022. Table: Copies of Danica Uskert and Annie Mok’s Unsustainable, 2020. Photo: Anne Tetzlaff.

    View of “Decriminalised Futures,” 2022. Table: Copies of Danica Uskert and Annie Mok’s Unsustainable, 2020. Photo: Anne Tetzlaff.

    “Decriminalised Futures”

    ICA - Institute of Contemporary Arts, London

    WE HAVE ALL PRESUMABLY HEARD the oft-repeated demand that sex workers be allowed to speak for themselves. This assertion, while a definitive rejection of tired, paternalistic tropes of prostitutes either as pitiable victims in need of saving or as social deviants who threaten public safety, health, and order, is hardly radical in 2022. Surely most visitors to “Decriminalised Futures,” the London Institute of Contemporary Arts’ exhibition of sex-worker art, will be in agreement on such

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  • Fausto Melotti, Teatrino (Little Theater), ca. 1950, glazed ceramic, painted clay, 18 1⁄8 × 11 3⁄4 × 3 1⁄2". From the series “Teatrini,” 1930–85.

    Fausto Melotti, Teatrino (Little Theater), ca. 1950, glazed ceramic, painted clay, 18 1⁄8 × 11 3⁄4 × 3 1⁄2". From the series “Teatrini,” 1930–85.

    Fausto Melotti

    Hauser & Wirth London | Savile Row

    “Fausto Melotti: Theatre” traces the prolific Italian artist’s marked affinity for the stage in works ranging from pencil-and-ink drawings of Orpheus dating to the 1920s and ’30s to delicate, quasi-scenographic sculptures in brass, wood, and fabric made beginning in the ’70s through 1986, the year of his death at the age of eighty-five. Though hints of allegory and allusions to storytelling are part of the dramaturgical dimension of Melotti’s work, the show suggests that he approached theater as a material rather than a narrative form. In Da Shakespeare (After Shakespeare), 1977, for instance,

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  • Miko Veldkamp, Mirror Stage, 2021, oil, acrylic, and ink on canvas, 54 × 48".

    Miko Veldkamp, Mirror Stage, 2021, oil, acrylic, and ink on canvas, 54 × 48".

    Miko Veldkamp

    WORKPLACE

    “The collective unconscious,” wrote Carl Jung in 1933, is “the sea upon which the ego rides like a ship.” It comprises “the accumulated human wisdom which we unconsciously inherit . . . the common human emotions which we all share”—everything that makes us jointly human and indissociably alike. We touch it, Jung argued, in dreams: Maybe the figures who populate our dreams are remixed fragments of ourselves, or maybe they’re archetypes who quasi-mystically gesture to the depths of history.

    This is the doubled dreamscape, a combination of self and beyond, that Miko Veldkamp’s paintings depict. “

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  • Donna Huddleston, The Stand In, 2021, color pencil on paper, 39 1⁄4 × 28 1⁄4".

    Donna Huddleston, The Stand In, 2021, color pencil on paper, 39 1⁄4 × 28 1⁄4".

    Donna Huddleston

    Simon Lee | London

    “There’s something about drawing the female form that holds a certain psychological power for me and that feels a necessary element of my work,” Donna Huddleston has said. Her first exhibition with Simon Lee was replete with striking and enigmatic women carefully rendered in Caran d’Ache colored pencil, graphite, pencil, and metal point on paper. Placed against elaborately patterned backgrounds, in stylized otherworldly tableaux, and within tightly constructed interior spaces, these figures appear as characters plucked from a larger narrative whose whole remains at a mysterious remove.

    The show

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