COLUMNS

  • Pop Quiz: Judy Chicago on the election

    To coincide with the November issue of Artforum on art and politics, including special projects by Wolfgang Tillmans, Dread Scott, and Eileen Myles, artforum.com invited a small group to select an indelible image or video related to the election.

    Judy Chicago is an artist, author, and educator.

    For our special focus on art and politics in the November 2016 issue of Artforum, subscribe or read online at artforum.com.

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  • Pop Quiz: Walter Benn Michaels

    To coincide with the November issue of Artforum on art and politics, including special projects by Wolfgang Tillmans, Dread Scott, and Eileen Myles, artforum.com invited a small group to select an indelible image or video related to the election.

    Sometimes the internal structure of the work of art gives you a better picture of politics than politics does.

    Walter Benn Michaels is a professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His most recent book is The Beauty of a Social Problem: Photography, Autonomy, Economy (University of Chicago, 2015).

    For our special focus on art and politics

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  • Pop Quiz: Jibade-Khalil Huffman on the election

    To coincide with the November issue of Artforum on art and politics, including special projects by Wolfgang Tillmans, Dread Scott, and Eileen Myles, artforum.com invited a small group to select an indelible image or video related to the election.

    Jibade-Khalil Huffman is an artist and poet living and working in Los Angeles.

    For our special focus on art and politics in the November 2016 issue of Artforum, subscribe or read online at artforum.com.

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  • Pop Quiz: Vanessa Place on the election

    To coincide with the November issue of Artforum on art and politics, including special projects by Wolfgang Tillmans, Dread Scott, and Eileen Myles, artforum.com invited a small group to select an indelible image or video related to the election.

    The most interesting people are always the monsters.

    Luckily, we are so many.

    Vanessa Place is a criminal defense artist.

    For our special focus on art and politics in the November 2016 issue of Artforum, subscribe or read online at artforum.com.

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  • Pop Quiz: Jacolby Satterwhite on the election

    To coincide with the November issue of Artforum on art and politics, including special projects by Wolfgang Tillmans, Dread Scott, and Eileen Myles, artforum.com invited a small group to select an indelible image or video related to the election.

    Jacolby Satterwhite is an artist based in New York.

    For our special focus on art and politics in the November 2016 issue of Artforum, subscribe or read online at artforum.com.

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  • Pop Quiz: McKenzie Wark on the election

    To coincide with the November issue of Artforum on art and politics, including special projects by Wolfgang Tillmans, Dread Scott, and Eileen Myles, artforum.com invited a small group to select an indelible image or video related to the election.

    #VastFeministConspiracy

    McKenzie Wark is chair of the department of culture and media at the New School for Social Research in New York. His most recent book is Molecular Red (Verso, 2015).

    For our special focus on art and politics in the November 2016 issue of Artforum, subscribe or read online at artforum.com.

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  • Pop Quiz: Grace Dunham on the election

    To coincide with the November issue of Artforum on art and politics, including special projects by Wolfgang Tillmans, Dread Scott, and Eileen Myles, artforum.com invited a small group to select an indelible image or video related to the election.

    THERES’S A MYTH that young people are politically disengaged. But young people—especially young people who bear the brunt of intersecting systems of oppression—recognize that the current political system is designed to fail them/us. So what do you do when you’re told your political identity rests on the choice between two competing embodiments of the

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  • “Richard Prince: The Douglas Blair Turnbaugh Collection (1977–1988)”

    ON JULY 28, 2016, Richard Prince retweeted an item from curator Marvin Heiferman’s feed about a $1 billion copyright-infringement suit that photographer Carol Highsmith had just filed against the stock-photo agencies Getty and Alamy, charging “gross misuse.” Earlier that day, Prince had tweeted a picture of a slightly enlarged black-and-white photocopy of his short 1977 text “Practicing Without a License.” He commented: “Feel like I got hacked. Or waxed. Or whacked. Mickie’d. Surprised they didn’t have my underwear on display. Shame.”

    What instigated the Twitter outburst of Assange-ish lingo and

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  • War Lorde

    MUSIC VIDEOS ARE BACK—even the New York Times thinks so. But one of the year’s best won’t be anywhere near this weekend’s MTV Video Music Awards. The montage for “A World Alone,” the closing track of producer Airport’s cassette-tape album Lorde Playlist, released earlier this spring by label Afternoonsmodeling, marries an amateur cover by American teenager Claire Maisto of the New Zealand pop artist’s closing track to her 2013 album Pure Heroine with combat footage, tragic accident replays, and other stumblings and sheddings of sovereignty. Some clips are branded with the name “War Clashes,”

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  • Leap of Faith

    ART AND THE OLYMPICS have a long, intertwined history. The ancient art created in competition to memorialize the earliest games eventually defined the vision of its modern iteration. In the early twentieth century, there were also art matches: Beginning in 1912, artists competed in fields like painting and sculpture, accompanied by exhibitions and new architecture. The tradition ended by 1948, but the 2016 Summer Olympics inaugurated the first artist-in-residency program. Combined with Rio de Janeiro’s new museums and public art competing for the city’s attention, art was an occasional tonic to

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  • Conceptual Art in Britain 1964–1979

    Conceptual Art in Britain 1964–1979

    Tate Britain, London

    April 12–August 29, 2016

    IN AUGUST 1966, the British artist John Latham, then a tutor at St. Martin’s School of Art in London, borrowed Clement Greenberg’s Art & Culture (1961) from the college library. He invited colleagues and students to his home, where they tore pages from the book, chewed them, and spat them into a flask. The resulting mulch was dissolved in acid solution, then distilled, and a phial of liquid returned to the library. Latham’s teaching contract was not renewed.

    A scurrilous piece animating the Tate exhibition’s otherwise

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  • Class Struggle

    THIS YEAR I WENT TO SUMMER SCHOOL. For an hour or so each day I escaped the business of life to indulge in the gleeful asceticism of online education. I let waves of learned, prerecorded prose wash over me. I lurked; I listened. My professor was Werner Herzog and this was his Master Class on filmmaking, and I along with several hundred fellow students––his “soldiers of cinema”––followed twenty-six lessons that taught us that nothing is what it seems.

    Herzog offered wisdom as if reading from a manifesto only half finished in his mind. His style was confessional and earnest. He was pragmatic (“

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